I choose treadmills with a lifetime warranty on both the motor and frame

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vertak
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Finding the right China Treadmill for you requires research. Fortunately the internet makes researching much easier than pre-internet days. There's all kinds of information on treadmills on the web. This article "The Smart Shopper's Treadmill Buying Guide" is one more chunk of information which I hope helps you buy the perfect treadmill that meets your wants, needs, and budget.

Just to be clear, there is no one perfect treadmill for everyone. Instead, the point of this smart shopper's treadmill buying guide is to alert you to the key features to look for when buying a treadmill.

Let's get started... what treadmill features should you look out for when buying a treadmill.

  1. The Motor

Fortunately, most treadmill motors on major treadmill brands are good. The common range in horsepower is 2.25 to 3.5. There are lower and higher motors, but that's the common range for residential treadmills. 2.5 to 3.0 horsepower motors should be more than sufficient. I'm a big guy so I prefer 3.0 horsepower motors.

Should you get a non-motorized treadmill? Treadmill machine is powerful, and it’s particularly impressive when we will be talking about cushioning. You can buy treadmills that absolutely enable you to adjust the quantity of cushioning. You spend much for this feature, but it’s really cool.

I wouldn't. Non-motorized treadmills are much cheaper, but paying a few hundred more dollars for a motor is worth it.

  1. Running Area

Treadmill running areas range from 55 inches to 60 inches long and are typically 20 inches wide. If you're taller than 6 feet, look at a 60 inch long running area. Frankly, I wouldn't consider a treadmill with a running area shorter than 60 inches, but I'm over six feet tall.

Try a treadmill at a gym or retail store to see what the right length is for you. If 55 inches works, that opens up more treadmill buying options for you.

  1. Cushioning

Treadmill technology is impressive, and it's particularly impressive where cushioning is concerned. You can get treadmills that actually enable you to adjust the amount of cushioning. You pay more for this feature, but it's pretty cool.

At the end of the day you want a treadmill with some cushioning, but not too much. I liken too much cushioning to running on the beach. Too much cushioning does not replicate running on pavement. That said, if you have joint issues, then more cushioning may be the right way to go. Like I said, there's no one-size-fits-all treadmill. That's the point of this treadmill buying guide article.

  1. Speed and Incline

What's your running regimen? Do you sprint and do HIIT? Or, do you run at a steady even pace? Or, maybe you're a walker? Treadmill speeds generally range from 10 to 12 miles per hour. If you're a sprinter, then look for a treadmill with top speeds of 12 miles per hour or more. If you're a walker or jogger, 10 is more than sufficient.

The incline element is also important. It's a good idea to incline your treadmill slightly in order to compensate for the fact running on treadmills is easier than on pavement. The reason for this is two-fold:

  1. Maximum Weight Capacity

It’s really hard to say whether a treadmill’s frame is great. However, one way to identify whether a said treadmill has a good frame, is its weight capacity… let’s just say, the higher the better. Many treadmills have weight magnitude maximums in the range of 250 to 300 pounds. That is why treadmills with a maximum user weight of 350 pounds or even higher are a better option. I never said to only buy treadmills with a 350 pound or higher weight volume; but it’s one option to consider.

  1. The Warranty

I choose treadmills with a lifetime warranty on both the motor and frame. Of course, these treadmills are costly. Longer warranties tell you that it is a high quality Commercial Treadmill normally. There is exclusion to be sure.

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